Pidinger Klettersteig: D – Via Ferrata at Hochstaufen

Pidinger Klettersteig


Pidinger Klettersteig: A Via Ferrata”classic”

The Pidinger Klettersteig is a very popular and well-known, more extreme Via Ferrata leading 1300hm in total up to the summit of the Hochstaufen (1771m), a mountain with panoramique views in the Berchtesgadener Alps. It’s difficulty scales up to D and in some sections it is exposed, but almost everywhere well secured and easily to follow.

As we climbed the Seven European Summits this year, we had barely time for climbing other mountains in the German or Austrian Alps. But after we’ve already ticked some classics like the Berchtesgadener Hochthron and the Watzmann Traverse from our list in 2015, some notable Ferratas had to follow this year anyway – and the Pidinger seemed to be a good one to add! šŸ™‚

Hochstaufen Piding
HOCHSTAUFEN via Pidinger Klettersteig: This is where we’re going!

The starting point for the Pidinger Via Ferrata is Urwies, a part of the municipality Piding. It’s really close to the german highway A8 and therefore easily reachable from both Munich and Salzburg. You take the exit “Bad Reichenhall” and are almost there. The car can be parked at a fee-free parking lot at the boom gate on the way to the Steiner and Maier Alm and from here it’s about a 1,5 hours forest walk to the entry point of the Ferrata.

Once you reach the entry, the Ferrata starts with a steep C-section. Those who already feel uncomfortable here should not climb in – it doesn’t get easier. šŸ˜‰


A long climb in a shady North Face

The Pidinger Klettersteig is 3-4 hours pure climbing joy!

There are only a few walking parts and most of the time it’s A-to-C scrambling and climbing terrain with some nice D-parts as well – never really easy and never really difficult, BUT LONG. Be prepared for 700hm of climbing, but with many options to rest and enjoy in the view. šŸ™‚

Pidinger Klettersteig woman girl
Maggy in a steep section at the beginning of the Pidinger Klettersteig
Picture spot Pidinger Klettersteig Hochstaufen
Perfect picture spot in the upper part of Pidinger Klettersteig Hochstaufen

You’re almost all the time in the shade and there are two emergency exits en route which take you to the standard ascent route of the Hochstaufen (via Steiner Alm). For a detailed topographie of the Ferrata, see the Pidinger Klettersteig on bergsteigen.com.


Top of Hochstaufen!

On the last meters of the Ferrata, the sun touched our faces and we were rewarded with a picture perfect summit time. šŸ™‚

The summit cross on top of Hochstaufen is really impressive, as are the views from the summit to the Watzmann and GroƟvenediger and above Salzburg, the Chiemgau and Berchtesgadener Land.

Summit cross Hochstaufen Berchtesgaden
Beautiful summit cross on top of Hochstaufen
View Salzburg Berchtesgaden Hochstaufen
View from Hochstaufen up to Watzmann and GroƟvenediger

Right beyond the summit is the Reichenhaller Haus, a perfectly located hut for some cool drinks and snacks (Make sure to check their website for opening hours and days!) and for the not-so climbing affine folks, there are also some normal hiking trails leading up to the summit of Hochstaufen from both, the Northern and Southern side.

Hochstaufen Blick Salzburg
View from top of Hochstaufen above the Slazburg mountains

The Pidinger Klettersteig is perfect for sustained climbers and hikers who accept a long day in exchange for a great climbing experience with spectactular views. When we climbed there in late October, we were lucky and almost any other people were there, BUT regularly it’s known to be really busy, especially on the weekend..

Anyway this is definitely a recommendation, so

HAVE FUN AND BE SAFE!

Youareanadventurestory outdoor girls
Great day @ Hochstaufen <3

And make sure you check our other Via Ferrata adventures, like the Dalfazer Wasserfall and the CIMA SAT at Lake Garda! šŸ˜‰


We also took a short video which you can find on our YOUTUBE-Channel, have fun watching:

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